How to Get More Clients with Social Media

A lot of the times you can hear things like: "Social media is really bad for marketing. I haven't sold a thing through social media". Quite often what all these people do is they're just posting the same thing over and over on Twitter or Facebook, stuffing their posts with every imaginable hashtag and linking to their homepage. They hope to reach their audience in that way, which, unfortunately, results in a complete waste of time.

This kind of tactic rarely can lead someone to success. It's completely useless and certainly won't give you more leads. But there are some ways to overcome this problem. Let's look at some of them.

Create Value in Your Posts

Creating value in your posts

If you can provide some help for users in your area of expertise, do it. Just simply search for the questions people ask and try to help them.

When people see the value you provide, that you're actually a professional in your field, they will naturally visit your profile, from there your site, blog or whatever and start following you. After following you for a while they will say "Ok, I see that you're a professional in your area, I share your opinion and want to work with you." So, eventually, at some point, they'll convert. The main thing here is to create value and help people along the way.

Share Your Personal Opinion

Being personal on social networks in another way to establish a great relationships with your potential customers. Don't be afraid to express your personal point of view on everything, and it's not necessarily has to be connected with work only.

Being personal on social networks

If you have something to say, for instance, about cats or dogs, just say it! It gives your conversations this "Human" aspect that people tend to like. No one wants to engage in a conversation with mass messaging, cross-posting machine. People like to feel as if they're special and they're the only one being spoken to.

Of course, not every opinion has to be positive. If you see somebody doing a bad service for others, don't just ignore it, leave a negative feedback or a complaint. It'll give them an opportunity to improve and fix the problem.

Don't Automate Everything

Today we have a lot of social automation tools like Buffer and Edgar, and they're a great tools, but you need to use them wisely. If you use them as, sort of, automated rotation machine, sharing content and stuff, you're making a big mistake.

When people sense that there's this crazy automation thing going on, they'll never respond to you. The message they get is "I really don't care about tou, I only need you to visit my website, that's it". So, this is definitely not the right way to go.

Now, certainly, you can use Buffer to schedule your blog posts now and then, but don't automate everything! Try to be involved with your audience. Find a strategy to create touchpoints with your community in a way that is natural and organic as possible.

Post scheduling with Buffer
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The main thing to remember here is that: People on social media like to engage with people, not some kind of soulless robots

Schedule a Time for Updates

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Someone may ask, "How much time per day do I have to spend on social media?" Well, that depends.

There's usually no universal answer to this question. On social media everything is about testing and evaluating your personal results. You can start with one hour per day, and then see if it works for you or not. If you don't have this amount of time, you can carve out 20-30 minutes every day to quickly answer someone's question or post and update.

There's a certain amount of discipline in making this happen, but it's undoubtedly better than post 50 tweets in one day and then disappear for a months.

Question: These are some of the principles that we're trying to use here at FossLook. How does your company acquire new customers on social media? Let us know in the comments.

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